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LETS GET DOWN TO BUSINESS.

Question :
Hi , I started a website a few months ago and I am ranking high on google but im not getting any sales. people are visiting , just not purchasing.  These are things i think my prices are too high (good quality products )  , not enough variety of products (working on it , changing focus ) , only got paypal(just approved merchant)  , is there anything i should be thinking about 

Question submitted 20/08/20 @ 09:04am
Industry: Start-ups
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  • Hi there,

    I don’t know anything about your product or website yet but, before you assume the issue is the price, CRO factors are probably worth considering. CRO stands for conversion rate optimization. Its purpose is to remove points of friction for visitors and increase the chances that a visitor will take a conversion action. Here are what I consider to be the most essential CRO tips.

    Use credibility and trust elements
    When a potential prospect visits your website for the first time, they may know very little about you. Build credibility and trust with:

    • Badges showing that your website is secure
    • A privacy policy
    • Testimonials from customers
    • If you have been featured somewhere well-known, mention it, such as “As featured in Forbes” (or whatever media sites lend credibility relevant to your target audience)
    • If you have support from industry analysts or from influencers in your sector, include quotes from them
    • If you have won any awards, include the badges on your website.

    Include visual content
    Infographics and compelling images are great website assets, but high-resolution images that haven’t been suitably compressed take a long time to load and can frustrate visitors. Take the time to optimize image size and quality for web use. http://optimizilla.com/ optimizes images for free.

    Put the most important content at the top left
    The Gutenberg rule of reading gravity indicates that most reader attention goes to the top left corner of a web page. The eye then tends to go to the top right, then to the bottom left and finally the bottom right of the page, which is considered a dead zone. Make sure that your most important information is shown in the top left-hand corner of your web page or content.

    Include calls to action
    Include call-to-action buttons for trial sign-ups, quote requests, etc. A call to action doesn’t have to be a button prompting an overt action, however. It could merely be a prompt to move the visitor further along the sales journey via, for example, a link to relevant case study pages.

    Capture email addresses
    Provide a newsletter sign-up option and/or relevant downloadable resources for visitors not ready to progress further. This allows you to stay in touch with them with drip email content.

    Avoid long sign-up forms
    Visitors are more likely to abandon sign-up forms if there are too many fields to fill out. Tools like HubSpot allow you to progressively ask for more information each time a prospect returns to your site. Alternatively, just ask for a name and email address.

    Use landing page and email confirmations
    A post-sign-up landing page and/or email confirmation reinforces your value position and ensures that prospects remember your brand. Add hyperlinks to additional content if you can include them in a helpful and appropriate way.

    Run A/B testing
    A/B testing allows you to test two different versions of content such as call-to-action buttons, headlines, page layouts, etc. A/B testing works when two different versions of content are served to separate visitors, allowing you to test which version converts most favourably. Marketing platforms like HubSpot and Marketo include A/B testing options in their more expensive subscription versions.

    A/B testing tools include:

    • Content experiments in Google Analytics (free)
    https://www.optimizely.com/ (free trial)

    Google “Optimizely competitors” and you will find more alternatives.

    Use heat maps
    Website heat-mapping software allows you to see where visitors hover and click on your pages. It can help you find and address points of friction. For example, you may find that some visitors are clicking on an image expecting it to hyperlink to other content. This is something you can address very quickly to improve the visitor experience.

    Heat-mapping tools include:

    https://www.crazyegg.com/
    https://www.google.com/analytics/ (free)
    https://www.hotjar.com

    Google “Crazy Egg competitors” and you will find more options.

    Get inside the head of your visitors
    CRO techniques work best when you understand your target audience well and can anticipate common objections and concerns at different stages in their buying journey. This allows you to serve visitors with content and calls to action that suit their personas and stage in their journey.

    Anticipate and overcome concerns
    Structure your content to address common concerns with features such as FAQs on the page, or links to additional resources such as technical information.

    Think “AIDA” (attention, interest, desire, action)
    AIDA is a marketing concept that stands for attention, interest, desire, action. Think of it like this: if you were dating, you wouldn’t walk up to a stranger in a bar and ask them to marry you. First, you must say hello and hopefully get them interested in you. Then you might build their interest in you over dinner. The desire might increase as you date for a while. Only at this stage would it make sense to propose marriage. It’s kind of the same online. It is probably pointless to try to convert a first-time visitor to your site to undertake a trial. However, tempting a first-time visitor to download a white paper or visit a product page may be a realistic goal.

    Additional CRO resources
    Here are some excellent CRO resources to help you find out more:
    https://moz.com/blog/category/conversion-rate-optimization
    https://conversion-rate-experts.com/articles/
    https://conversionsciences.com/blog/

    I hope this helps,

    Sarah

    Hi

    Apart from doing analysis of your web site, have you done the analysis of the traffic ? what is the bounce rate ? from which area they are visiting ? who are your competitors and what is happening on their web site… ? Conversion through web site is one thing but fundamentally is your product pitched correctly in terms of price, range, market etc… I dont know your product or web site but is it restricted to New Zealand or only certain part of country… The ratio of conversion of sales through web site is very small just in single digits… so How big is your market size…

    ajit

    Hi

    Apart from doing analysis of your web site, have you done the analysis of the traffic ? what is the bounce rate ? from which area they are visiting ? who are your competitors and what is happening on their web site… ? Conversion through web site is one thing but fundamentally is your product pitched correctly in terms of price, range, market etc… I dont know your product or web site but is it restricted to New Zealand or only certain part of country… The ratio of conversion of sales through web site is very small just in single digits… so How big is your market size…

    ajit

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