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Russell Douglas

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    Hi there,

    I’m aligned with Andy’s commentary. I’d add that keeping things simple will be your friend in the early days. Building the website and e-commerce options should be simple, super cheap and fast to execute on. There’s a girth of off the shelf tools that can get you up and running in no time. We use Squarespace a lot for both our own website and some of the simpler client website needs. It’s easy to use, update and add content to as a non web expert. These are the types of platforms I’d recommend.

    But first up is understanding your potential customers needs and wants. What pain points exist today that aren’t being serviced by your competition. What’s the gap. If you haven’t done so already create a short topic guide, questionnaire or survey (surveymonkey is a good platform) and speak to potential customers. You’ll start to see emerging themes and key challenges they face in the space you’re looking to fill with your business idea. You can also broach the subject of e-commerce and the app route (I’d hold off on that initially tbh) and any other burning questions you have about your route to market.

    These insights will provide you with initial views to help you prioritize the features you offer and how you prop up the first iteration of your product/service.

    Finally, I’d suggest you take an mvp (minimum viable product) mindset. Start small: launch, learn, iterate, test, iterate etc. Consider launching the product with a small cohort of customers to get initial feedback and to iron out the bumps in your initial product/service offering.

    Good luck with it all,
    Russ

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    Lucky last – check out http://www.chooice.co.nz – it’s a marketplace for NZ businesses to help drive awareness, reach and ultimately sales. It was set up by the Manaaki founders.

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    Hi Michelle,

    I’ve had a quick look through the website and social channels and there’s a lot of great content and engagement.

    My advice would look to a number of strategies to increase your digital footprint and drive traffic to your digital channels which should ultimately lead to sales.

    Firstly get a plan behind your marketing – check out a few of the responses I’ve given to others needing support and advice with their approach to marketing – https://www.manaaki.io/forums/users/russell-douglas/replies/

    One model that comes to mind to help you to frame your thinking is DRIP.

    DRIP is simply Differentiate, Remind, Inform, and Persuade and acts as a guide when considering how you might turn up under each.

    DIFFERENTIATE
    Consider how Pure NZ Prints differentiates itself relative to the significant amount of competition out there. What is it that makes your offering stand out? Why should I buy from you and not the sea of other print and gallery specialists? How can you stand out? What can you offer that makes your business sticky?

    What if… you raised your profile as the seasoned expert in sourcing unique, hard to find NZ prints. Get your personal brand and that of Pure NZ Prints into the media.

    An example of the power of this: we’ve been looking for a seasoned financial advisor recently and had a number of folks recommended but we also saw an article online in the Herald where a financial advisor gave advice. We’re meeting her next week.

    The power of profile and PR is something you might benefit from and help you to stand out in a crowded marketplace.

    How else might you differentiate and amplify your customer value proposition? Could you create a more overt New Zealand led brand experience. Is there an opportunity to tell each New Zealand artists story to provide a deeper connection to the pieces you’re selling.

    Above all think hard about how you stand out, what you can offer customers that’s unique, that sets you apart and makes people want to talk about you.

    REMIND
    An obvious marketing strategy but one we see being under utilized. How many times have you bought a product online and the initial experience was superb. A real connection with the brand, potentially even some personal email correspondence and a seamless e-commerce experience. But then – nothing. No follow up, no cross or up sell, no brand building, nothing. It happens all the time.

    Another example: I recently signed up for a bit of a trial to a coffee roasters speciality bean delivery service. They knew I was buying one bag initial to trial the service. It’s been several weeks and I’ve heard nothing from them. No follow up email asking me about the flavors, of the beans were awesome or not. Whether I’d like a small discount on a subscription service. Nothing.

    So I’d suggest you get back in touch with previous customers. Identify the ones that spent big, the ones that bought more than once. Now call them or email them personally. Targeted, personal comms is one of the most powerful engagement strategies I’ve seen for small business. It’s not a scaled marketing play but for your most valuable customers or those with the greatest potential to buy it’s a winning formula.

    INFORM
    We all love ‘new’ and inform is all about letting your customer base know what’s going on with your brand, the market in general and the new products you have coming out. Tell your story, reach out, and stay front of mind.

    PERSUADE
    Finally it’s down to persuading prospects to convert into customers. This is all about the art of the sale. Amplifying the key attributes of your product and service. Convincing me that buying a print will enhance my life or that of others I choose to gift it to. It goes beyond the product and into the story of the benefits buying that product will deliver.

    An example: Ikea, the Swedish furniture retailer, offers its customers the ability to place their products in-situ in a virtual rendering of their home. So customers can see what a sofa or a dining table will look like in their home before making the purchase. This is a cracker example of persuasion in action.

    What might you do to get browsers over the line?

    There’s a multitude of other models and ways to drive customers through the funnel but in the end it comes down to picking a solid framework, ideating with your team and getting your plan in place then acting on it.

    Test and learn. See what works, refine your strategy, and when you find something that really turns the dial do more of it.

    Good luck,
    Russ

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    Hi there,

    Thanks for getting in touch. Congrats on getting the business to the point you’re now able to now focus on your marketing strategy. Building a brand and driving marketing success does take time and in my experience the most successful brands have understood the value of clearly defining their customer value proposition (cvp), positioning and differentiation, pricing, and the customer experience.

    The following is a bit of a copy n paste of previous advice I’ve provided but I do think it’s relevant to your position.
    I’d split my advice into 3 areas; building your brand, finding your unique customer value proposition and marketing your services.

    Depending on the time you have to dedicate to this will determine how far you take my recommended approach below.

    I’d start with the lean canvas which can help you to determine your own angle. How you’ll stand out vs the competition. Who your competitors are. What your unique value proposition is. What your unfair advantage is. How you’ll price your services to be competitive and sticky. https://leanstack.com/leancanvas

    Once you’ve had a crack at the top line canvas I’d then suggest developing a more detailed plan using an old marketing framework: SOSTAC, which stands for Situation, Objectives, Strategy, Tactics, Action, Control.

    * Situation assesses where a business is presently (Where are you now? Who are the competition? What’s the market size? who are your target customers and where are they? Are there any gaps your business could fill? Etc)
    * Objectives sets the mission or goals for the business (Where do you want to be? What are the 3-5 objectives you have for the business? E.g. For this financial year: To grow the business revenues from $x to $x with a profit of x%. To achieve a products sales target of $x. To grow your customer base to x. To drive brand awareness by x%.)
    * Strategy is an overview of how to achieve the objectives (How do you get there? What are the high level strategies you’ll deploy to reach your objectives? E.g. Target customers and drive acquisition through onboarding offers. Raise brand awareness for specific customer types using targeted comms, etc etc).
    * Tactics are the details of strategy (e.g. the marketing mix. These are the specific initiatives you’ll employ to deliver on your strategies).
    * Actions how do you ensure excellent execution of the plan. (E.g. Using simple planning tools you can plot your tactical initiatives across a calendar).
    * Control establishes how you know whether you are getting there (What do you need to monitor? E.g. Put in place simple measurement tools to allow you to understand what tactics are achieve if the best outcome for your business. Use A/B split testing with your ads on FB, monitor if there was a spike in website traffic or sales after an article was published, after a promotion, did you see a significant uptake? Etc etc).

    By systematically working through each of the areas above you’ll land on a clear direction and the tactical efforts you need to take the business forward.

    Further information can be found here;

    SOSTAC® marketing planning model guide

    When it comes to bringing it all to life it’s really down to you and your support team to get creative and think differently to your competitors. What are they doing on the socials, who’s demanding the best position in the market and why, how are they turning up differently. Considering these questions will hopefully lead you to a set of smart strategies and tactics (as part of your sostac plan) to smash the competition!

    Good luck,
    Russ

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    Hi there,

    It would be really useful to understand more about your business to be able to tailor our responses accordingly but as a starter for 10 I’d split my initial advice into 3 areas; building your brand, finding your unique customer value proposition and marketing your services.

    Depending on the time you have to dedicate to this will determine how far you take my recommended approach below.

    I’d start with the lean canvas which can help you to determine your own angle. How you’ll stand out vs the competition. Who your competitors are. What your unique value proposition is. What your unfair advantage is. How you’ll price your services to be competitive and sticky. https://leanstack.com/leancanvas

    Once you’ve had a crack at the top line canvas I’d then suggest developing a more detailed plan using an old marketing framework: SOSTAC, which stands for Situation, Objectives, Strategy, Tactics, Action, Control.

    * Situation assesses where a business is presently (Where are you now? Who are the competition? What’s the market size? who are your target customers and where are they? Are there any gaps your business could fill? Etc)

    * Objectives sets the mission or goals for the business (Where do you want to be? What are the 3-5 objectives you have for the business? E.g. For this financial year: To grow the business revenues from $x to $x with a profit of x%. To achieve a products sales target of $x. To grow our customer base to x. To drive brand awareness by x%.)

    * Strategy is an overview of how to achieve the objectives (How do you get there? What are the high level strategies you’ll deploy to reach your objectives? E.g. Target customers and drive acquisition through onboarding offers (buy 2 get 3rd for 50% etc). Raise brand awareness for specific customer types using targeted comms, etc etc).

    * Tactics are the details of strategy (e.g. the marketing mix. These are the specific initiatives you’ll employ to deliver on your strategies. E.g. Targeted FB ads and email campaigns, write articles for blogs, partner with marketplaces that have greater reach, sell locally, raise your own profile in the community through social good etc etc).

    * Actions how do you ensure excellent execution of the plan. (E.g. Using simple planning tools you can plot your tactical initiatives across a calendar).

    * Control establishes how you know whether you are getting there (What do you need to monitor? E.g. Put in place simple measurement tools to allow you to understand what tactics are achieve if the best outcome for your business. Use A/B split testing with your ads on FB, monitor if there was a spike in website traffic or sales after an article was published, after a promotion, did you see a significant uptake? Etc etc).

    By systematically working through each of the areas above you’ll land on a clear direction and the tactical efforts you need to take the business forward.

    Further information can be found here;

    SOSTAC® marketing planning model guide

    When it comes to bringing it all to life it’s really down to you and your support team to get creative and think differently to your competitors. What are they doing on the socials, who’s demanding the best position in the market and why, how are they turning up differently. Considering these questions will hopefully lead you to a set of smart strategies and tactics (as part of your sostac plan) to smash the competition!

    As mentioned upfront we can provide far more tailored advice if we have a good sense of your business so if you’re able to outline what business you’re in and your business objectives that’d be great and allow us to help further.

    Cheers,
    Russ

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    Hi,

    Had a look at the site on mobile and I love the proposition, taste profile and journey offer.

    I love my coffee and have a good quality coffee machine and grinder and make coffee daily. So I did your taste profile and to be honest while I enjoyed it I did find it a bit abstract in that I wasn’t entirely clear how best to align myself and select the various flavour cues. I may be a little unrefined but it did make me think, ‘If I’m into my coffee and I’m finding this tricky what might others feel.”

    In contrast, and this might be an option for you, a few years ago I signed up to WineFriend. I worked through a very simple taste profile test and was actually called by one of their staff to chat through my profile in more detail. It was a great way to unpack the complexities of choosing wines slightly outside of my usual ‘go to’s’ but it’s what the WineFriend team were able to do for me and off we went. I now relish the subscription box that arrives each month and also have the option to rate the wine I receive. This helps WineFriend to refine my subscription wines and when I’ve noted a wine as not to my liking they call me to chat through the why.

    This blend of digital and human connection is a significant customer benefit and has ensured their offer remains relevant and that I feel looked after.

    Bean Merchant could definitely lift and shift a number of the tactics above as well as some of WineFriends awareness drivers. They regularly run member get member offers and discounts to encourage their loyal followers to get their buddies onboard.

    A while back they actually gifted me a bottle of my favourite Pinot Noir completely free in return for simply asking me to send a sign up gift offer to a friend. Their thinking was that they could spend on advertising and that might work or they could use the same money and drive acquisition via their loyal customer base. Nice.

    I also heard of an interesting innovation out of Scotland recently. Obviously the whisky distillers are seeing no tourist visits at the moment and so Glenlivit decided to offer customers the ability to buy a tasting pack. The pack of 3 miniatures was sent out to customers and they were also invited to a live tasting event where the master distiller provided tasting notes. There was also traditional music and a q&a session. Kinda cool in this new normal. Is there something in this for Bean Merchant? Could you offer new customers a curated tasting experience with mini packs so they could do the ole Pepsi Challenge at home with their coffee, rate them and maybe discuss things with a professional roaster.

    A final note – I think your pricing is bang on as it’s a curated service offering a tailored and premium coffee experience but is on par with the supermarket pricing for mainstream beans.

    So all the best of luck to you. There’s heaps more ideas that could be applied but I do think the ‘member get member’ approach coupled with your team reaching out and calling new customers to give them personal support and guidance would be a good start. Customer advocacy is a proven strategy and one WineFriend, MyFoodBag and other subscription based services have used to their benefit. The branded experience is also another tactic these guys use doubling down on the ‘unpacking movement’ with free samples, recipes, promotions etc.

    I’ve just ordered a 1kg bag of Mahia, aligned to my taste profile, so let’s see how we go!

    Best,
    Russ

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    Hi Sarah,

    Thanks for getting in touch. Congrats on getting the business to the point you’re now able to pay yourself and get some marketing support on board. Building a brand and driving marketing success does take time and in my experience the most successful brands have understood the value of clearly defining their customer value proposition (cvp), positioning and differentiation, pricing, and the customer experience.

    Ahead of getting into strategic recommendations I had a couple of immediate observations having had a quick browse, on mobile, through the site:

    I wasn’t clear on what the offer to ‘style your shoes, slides or boots with details suited to your personal brand‘ meant and having added a few products into my cart I didn’t see any options to do so?

    I didn’t understand the benefit of calling out an all male team?

    The pop ups saying someone had just bought products that appeared every few seconds was a little distracting and personally I simply didn’t believe then. I find these types of features a bit gimmicky and inauthentic to brand building.

    If it takes 3 weeks to make the shoes then I think that needs to be understood and the reasons why clearly articulated. If the shoes are being made by hand by the team of artisans that’s potentially a benefit a customer would be willing to wait for.

    The intro talks specifically to shoes but the supporting main image is of women holding leather bags. Once you’ve been through the steps below I would recommend rewriting the introductory copy to reflect your new and unique customer value proposition.

    So onto the recommendations;

    I’d split my advice into 3 areas; building your brand, finding your unique customer value proposition and marketing your services.

    Depending on the time you have to dedicate to this will determine how far you take my recommended approach below.

    I’d start with the lean canvas which can help you to determine your own angle. How you’ll stand out vs the competition. Who your competitors are. What your unique value proposition is. What your unfair advantage is. How you’ll price your services to be competitive and sticky. https://leanstack.com/leancanvas

    Once you’ve had a crack at the top line canvas I’d then suggest developing a more detailed plan using an old marketing framework: SOSTAC, which stands for Situation, Objectives, Strategy, Tactics, Action, Control.

    * Situation assesses where a business is presently (Where are you now? Who are the competition? What’s the market size? who are your target customers and where are they? Are there any gaps your business could fill? Etc)
    * Objectives sets the mission or goals for the business (Where do you want to be? What are the 3-5 objectives you have for the business? E.g. For this financial year: To grow the business revenues from $x to $x with a profit of x%. To achieve a products sales target of $x (you should split this by product lines, i.e shoes, bags, robes etc). To grow our customer base to x. To drive brand awareness by x%.)
    * Strategy is an overview of how to achieve the objectives (How do you get there? What are the high level strategies you’ll deploy to reach your objectives? E.g. Target customers and drive acquisition through onboarding offers (buy 2 get 3rd for 50% etc). Raise brand awareness for specific customer types using targeted comms, etc etc).
    * Tactics are the details of strategy (e.g. the marketing mix. These are the specific initiatives you’ll employ to deliver on your strategies. E.g. Targeted FB ads and email campaigns, write articles for fashion blogs, partner with marketplaces that have greater reach, sell at locally renowned markets, can you get your products onto the high street by selling to a retailer, raise your own profile in the community through social good etc etc).
    * Actions how do you ensure excellent execution of the plan. (E.g. Using simple planning tools you can plot your tactical initiatives across a calendar).
    * Control establishes how you know whether you are getting there (What do you need to monitor? E.g. Put in place simple measurement tools to allow you to understand what tactics are achieve if the best outcome for your business. Use A/B split testing with your ads on FB, monitor if there was a spike in website traffic or sales after an article was published, after a promotion, did you see a significant uptake? Etc etc).

    By systematically working through each of the areas above you’ll land on a clear direction and the tactical efforts you need to take the business forward.

    Further information can be found here;

    SOSTAC® marketing planning model guide

    When it comes to bringing it all to life it’s really down to you and your support team to get creative and think differently to your competitors. What are they doing on the socials, who’s demanding the best position in the market and why, how are they turning up differently. Considering these questions will hopefully lead you to a set of smart strategies and tactics (as part of your sostac plan) to smash the competition!

    Good luck,
    Russ

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    Hi Graham,

    Sounds frustrating with the inability to update the website. I’m assuming you’ve requested to migrate it to another agency/consultant so you can amend the site in order to support your business development. Assuming that’s underway it’s going to be important to present the full extent of your range including the new timber options, the price point and inspiring examples of similar concepts out in the wild even if they’re not yours.

    I stumbled upon this link the other day and it’s alerts sharing as they’re inspiring small format examples and many have price points included – https://www.epicmonday.com

    Good luck,
    Russ

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    Many thanks for your thoughts and advice. Working through next steps and will report back with any updates. Thanks, Russ

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    Hi Nikki,

    Great advice above. Here’s a few more thoughts. So I had a good review of the website and your meals look delicious! 

    Quick query for you: what’s your website views to conversion looking like?

    I think there are a few things you might consider doing to help potential customers to sign up.

    1. Consider your customer value proposition (CVP).

    What is it that you offer that’s different to the competition? Consider framing your cvp using the following framework.

    Good2Eat provides (add core service offering) for (add target audience) because (add differentiated reason to choose).

    Here’s a recent example;
    OpenLoop provides smart, hassle-free, access to hundreds of operational EV charging units via a simple and intuitive App
    for EV drivers who are concerned about running out of charge and fed up with multi-mode payment methods
    because no one is offering a networked, frictionless EV charging experience.

    Customer benefits:
    One App.
    Easily find operational EV charging units near you.
    One simple bill.
    Transparent pricing.
    Peace of mind.

    2. Introduce special offers and tempting reasons to sign up.

    There are currently no offers on the site to help convert customers so a simple fix. You could think about offering an introductory offer, e.g subscribe today for 3 months and receive 2 free meals. Order 5 meals for the price of 4. Refer a friend and get a free meal. Just make sure you do the math and that you’re not losing money in doing so, or if these offers are loss leaders that you put a time frame on them.

    3. Don’t make me think. 
Don’t make me think is a great book by Steve Krug on UX but I think this statement is an excellent way to consider your communication and experience approach. Simplify the experience and ensure your offer and benefits are crystal clear.

    So let’s consider how a don’t make me think lens might look. 

    The subscription service is a little buried and I couldn’t view the options without registering. The delicious looking meals on the homepage could be clearly labelled, i.e $14 per meal, serves 1. It may be useful to add the portion sizes and ingredients.

    I’d suggest offers and the process is raised to the homepage, i.e.
    – Order 5 meals for the price of 4.
    – Sign up for at least 3 month subscription and get a free gift.
    – Remember to order by 11.30pm on Monday to get your order for the following week.
    – We deliver on Tue and Fri each week and you don’t need to be home.
    – We’re 100% eco-friendly.
    – We deliver to (insert locations here). As I noticed you don’t delivery to rural locations.
    – It might be worth curating week meal plans for those that need a bit of a leading hand.

    Anyhoo, food for thought (pun intended, insert eye roll here).

    Good luck.

    Cheers,
    Russ

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    Hi Graham,

    I can definitely see why everyone loves what you and your team do. I remember sitting around with buddies chatting about creating an office out of shipping containers for the end of the garden and we’d check out these elaborate designs from overseas like this one from the contemporist – https://tinyurl.com/y7dfah2w

    I checked out your website and it’s great – professionally put together with very clearly laid out options and a good range of inspiration from around the globe. The only thing I’d change would be the product mock ups so they looked more contemporary and include customer projects you’ve previously undertaken.

    So what’s the challenge? Awareness, reach, price point, planning consent barriers?

    I appreciate what must go into the build of these shipping container studios/homes but I did wonder if the pricing strategy allowed for maximum reach and affordability for the average Kiwi. With the entry Robin studio product coming in at $92,329 (albeit you’re offering it for $79k at the mo) I wonder if it’s just not stacking up for would be buyers – particularly as we see ourselves in recessionary times.

    I’m not trying to poke the bear but having just done a simple bit of desktop research I was presented with multiple contemporary studio options, made from wood but looking pretty tempting, from as little as $15k.

    So I think there’s a job to be done on the positioning, working on a ‘no consent required’ option, and working through the pricing models.

    I’d say your key opportunity at the mo is the ‘down the garden’ home office based on the significant recalibration of our new normal working existence. In a survey I saw recently 39% of workers wanted to continue to work from home, 8% were happy to go back to the office full time (these will be those living in shared accommodation and generally the younger demographic which won’t be your market), and a whopping 53% wanted the new normal to be a blend of both. But I know from chatting to scores of my clients that not everyone is geared up for that blended model. I’ve chatted to clients in their kitchens and bedrooms on Zoom with kids, dogs, babies and other halves all making noise in the background. There will be a lot of professional folks considering their new home office options and many will need an end of the garden sanctuary. It’s a big opportunity for you in my opinion.

    So in signing off – I love the shipping container studio/home concept and wish you all the best. I’ve written some broader marketing advice on other posts that may be of use and Manaaki recently penned an article on that which you can check out on Stuff; https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/prosper/advice/300037364/how-to-reach-your-market-steps-and-tools-to-grow-your-business

    If you want to chat further please feel free to reach out.

    Cheers,
    Russ

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    Hi there,

    Great advice above. The search is very clearly a big challenge and will help customers that find you in the first place.

    I’ll crack this from an angle I think would helping the broader context of your business.

    I think the key challenge is in building your business and growth strategy so if that’s the case and you’re open to some reading and considering how your business might grow I’d recommend you work through the steps below as a kickstarter.

    I’d start with the lean canvas which can help you to determine your own angle. How you’ll stand out vs the competition. Who your competitors are. What your unique value proposition is. What your unfair advantage is. How you’ll price your services to be competitive and sticky. Is there an opportunity to develop a subscription based model? https://leanstack.com/leancanvas

    Once you’ve had a crack at the top line canvas I’d then suggest developing a more detailed plan using an old marketing framework: SOSTAC, which stands for Situation, Objectives, Strategy, Tactics, Action, Control.

    * Situation assesses where a business is presently (Where are you now? Who are the competition? What’s the market size? Who are your target customers and where are they? Are there any gaps your business could fill? Etc)

    * Objectives sets the mission or goals for the business (Where do you want to be? What are the 3-5 objectives you have for the business? E.g. For the first year: To grow the business revenues from $x to $x with a profit of x%. To achieve a product sales target of $x. To grow our customer base to x. To drive brand awareness by x%.)

    * Strategy is an overview of how to achieve the objectives (How do you get there? What are the high level strategies you’ll deploy to reach your objectives? E.g. Target customers and drive product sales through launch offers like buy 2 books get the third free. Raise brand awareness in the community using targeted comms, etc etc).

    * Tactics are the details of strategy (e.g. the marketing mix. These are the specific initiatives you’ll employ to deliver on your strategies. E.g. Targeted FB ads, join local business networks, conduct door flyer drops, write articles for local press, offer a recurring revenue bundle such as a subscription to your book service that comes with associated products (e.g. you might set up a book club and give special deals, exclusive presentations etc. This will assist with managing cash flow and provide some predictability on revenues), raise your own profile in the community through social good etc etc).

    * Actions how do you ensure excellent execution of the plan. (E.g. Using simple planning tools you can plot your tactical initiatives across a calendar).

    * Control establishes how you know whether you are getting there (What do you need to monitor? E.g. Put in place simple measurement tools to allow you to understand what tactics are achieve if the best outcome for your business. Use A/B split testing with your ads on FB, monitor if there was a spike in website traffic or sales after an article was published in the local press, after promoting your subscription based offer via, say a member get member offer, did you see a significant uptake? Etc etc).

    By systematically working through each of the areas above you’ll land on a clear direction and the tactical efforts you need to take the business forward.

    Further information can be found here;
    SOSTAC® marketing planning model guide https://www.smartinsights.com/digital-marketing-strategy/sostac-model/

    When it comes to bringing it all to life it’s really down to you to get creative and think differently to your competitors. What are they doing on the socials, who’s demanding the best position in the market and why, how are they turning up differently. Considering these questions will hopefully lead you to a set of smart strategies and tactics (as part of your sostac plan) to smash the competition!

    Good luck,
Russ

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    Morning Claire,

    Depending upon how large your products are and how often you add new products you might want to consider doing the photography yourself using some smart tools. The following ‘home photo studio light box’ might be a good option and isn’t too pricey. Here’s a few options: https://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-Electronics-Photo-Background-Shooting-Tents/zgbs/electronics/3444581

    If that’s not a goer we have a basic studio set up (white backdrop panel, 2 professional lights, tripod) and a decent camera so depending on the number of products might be able to help out.

    Cheers,
    Russ

    Russ@dandco.nz
    0220672689

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    Hi Amanda,

    Please have a read of the following posts as they might spark some fresh thinking. https://www.manaaki.io/forums/users/russell-douglas/replies || The posts cover things like empathy mapping, lean canvas, marketing strategy prompts, statement starters for ideation which I’d hope they’d prompt some new thinking and opportunities for you.

    All the best,
    Russ